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Papua New Guinea Part 1 (of 3): The Huli People Photographed and presented by Jair (Yair) Moreshet, 2009 © ( Website: www.Jair-Moreshet.com Email: Jair.Moreshet@gmail.com ) Authentic sound recorded in parallel by Wayne Trudeau The island of New Guinea is the second largest in the world (Greenland is the first). It is located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, in the region of Melanesia. The independent state of Papua New Guinea is occupying the eastern half of the island (the western part belongs to Indonesia), plus numerous offshore smaller islands. Papua New Guinea is mostly mountainous and covered with tropical rainforest, as well as large flood-plains surrounding the major tropical rivers - Fly and Sepik. Highlands pi e S sin a kB - When watched from a satellite (facing southward) it makes it look green in a stark contrast to the nearby desert of Australia. Papua New Guinea is one of the most diverse countries on Earth, with over 850 languages (out of a population of 6 million). The country is one of the world's least explored, both culturally (people) and geographically. The rugged terrain makes it difficult to penetrate. Most of the access today is by light aircrafts operating off unpaved (and un-manned) airstrips. The Huli people live in the Highlands and is one of the last discovered peoples on the face of the earth. They have been discovered just in 1936 by Australians who were searching for gold and they were colonized in 1951. A Huli man on the local road in an everyday casual-traditional dress. In his belt – a knife made of bone. The use of umbrella, though not terribly traditional, is very common. Huli people on the local road in modern-inclined dress for the weekend market. A vine bridge in the Highlands rainforest. Huli men in full ceremonial-traditional dress in a final touch to their body decoration in preparation to their traditional ceremonial dance . Huli men in traditional ceremonial dance . Both their dress/decoration and the “choreography” mimic the revered Bird Of Paradise. The dance is held on a victory in tribal warfare, which is still common. Whereas Huli men in everyday life take care practically just of the warfare, women do the subsistence agriculture, growing vegetables and pigs. The headdress used by the Huli men as a bed for further decoration with feathers is a wig made of human hair. The wigs are grown and shaped on actual heads of young poor men who don’t have the means for buying a bride. They cut and sell them eventually for use by others. These poor men dedicate their life to the process for up to three years, away from women. They spend these years in a group here in the “school” for wigs, which carries the expertise through generations. Here in the “school” for wigs, applying the right bunch of leaves, magic spells, and fresh brook water as a part of the process. In order to protect the shape of the growing wig they sleep at night with their head supported by this special construction. (The red teeth is common and is the result of chewing the Betel Nut which has the effect of a mild stimulant.) Huli’s basic social structure is the clan (“hamula” in Mediterranean terms) who hold to a piece of land, typically delineated and defended by a mud wall (here) and/or by a “moat” (a ditch carrying water). The head of a clan in front of the men’s house. The women are considered dangerous for men and therefore live in a separate house that they share with the pigs. They meet basically just once a month to copulate (typically outdoors, daytime). A woman in front of her house that she shares with the pigs. The woman’s house. The pigs’ room is ahead on the left, open fireplace in the middle (notice the burnt walls). Women’s typical attire. It includes a bag (“bilum”), carried by head. The mysterious Israeli connection: The locally hand-made “bilum” bag of this woman surprisingly includes an Israeli/Jewish Menorah and the Hebrew word SHALOM (peace). The old way of producing fire by friction. …and using the fire for smoking. The entrance to the land of another Huli clan over a typical “moat”. This “sun dance” is performed for the sake of good luck and bounty. -This clan specializes in it and provide it as a service to other clans. The one in the group representing “the evil”. Huli wedding: The bride is the girl in the middle, 14 of age. The wedding is basically about negotiating her price. Her tough grandmother (foremost) is the negotiator on this side. Huli wedding: Here is the experienced groom, negotiating for his side. The basic currency is pigs. In the course of negotiation the tough grandmother hit him by a stick. Papua New Guinea Part 2 (of 3): The Sepik River Photographed and presented by Jair (Yair) Moreshet, 2009 © ( Website: www.Jair-Moreshet.com Email: Jair.Moreshet@gmail.com ) The island of New Guinea is the second largest in the world (Greenland is the first). It is located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, in the region of Melanesia. The independent state of Papua New Guinea is occupying the eastern half of the island (the western part belongs to Indonesia), plus numerous offshore smaller islands. Papua New Guinea is mostly mountainous and covered with tropical rainforest, as well as large flood-plains surrounding the major tropical rivers - Fly and Sepik. Highlands pi e S sin a kB - When watched from a satellite (facing southward) it makes it look green in a stark contrast to the nearby desert of Australia. Most of the access in PNG is by light aircrafts operating off unpaved airstrips. Here in the Sepik River basin (which is equivalent to the Amazon), approaching to landing by a small aircraft. In the photo - the serpentine Karawari River, - a tributary of the Sepik, and the local airstrip. The local airstrip “terminal” with casual local “welcoming” people. Watching manmade birds carrying strange people is apparently a good way of spending time. Leaving the airstrip by foot on the way to the water highway system -- the Sepik River and its tributary rivers. The Karawari River area at sunset. The Kundiman II Village on the Karawari River (the Yokoim Tribe). Notice the boys in the tiny canoe boat returning from their day at school (which we have just visited). Sago is a starch extracted from the stem of the Sago palm tree. It is a major staple food for the people here. As a part of the process it is washed by river water. Houses are big and elevated on stilts as the water level keep changing in a wide range. Notice the girl working on her makeup, though body decoration is not as elaborate as with the Huli people. Separate kitchens are common. The interior of a floating lodge (slow), from which we launched our small boat visits to the various villages. - An Australian entrepreneurship decorated by local art and operated by local man-power. The Konmei Village on the Konmei River (the Yokoim Tribe) The Konmei Village – a welcome performance Youth “initiation” by scarring the skin in the shape of a crocodile is very common. It is mostly applied to boys, though. People believe that they are descendants of a primeval crocodile. Going hunting for wild pigs. The Manjami Village on the Karawari River (the Yokoim Tribe) The Momeri Village on the Krosmeri River. A household farming of crocodiles, caught in the river. The local guide explains that HIS people in this area are NOT cannibals, but rather HEAD-HUNTERS. “Black Water Lakes” is an area covered by swamp-lakes surrounding the river. The level of the muddy shallow water and their reach keep changing all the time, even during a single day. The Kabriman Village in the Black Water Lakes (the Kabriman Tribe). The big Spirit House of the Kabriman Village – a house of warship to the ancestral spirits. The big Spirit House of the Kabriman Village: Hunted (human) heads used to be suspended here by this big column. The Spirit House is still in use, but they don’t hunt for heads any more. -Not that much because of the theoretical government law which doesn’t reach here, but apparently under the influence of the Christian Mission. The chief The big Spirit House. The Kabriman Village – a welcoming dance. The ever changing waters of the “Black Water Lakes”. The Mindimbit I Village on the Krosmeri River. The villages in the area specialize in “Ancestral Art” – an amazing array of carvings including masks and statues (the ones I brought home combine beautifully into my collection…) The Tambunan Village on the Sepik River. Papua New Guinea Part 3 (of 3): The Mt. Hagen Show Photographed and presented by Jair (Yair) Moreshet, 2009 © ( Website: www.Jair-Moreshet.com Email: Jair.Moreshet@gmail.com ) Authentic sound recorded in parallel by Wayne Trudeau The island of New Guinea is the second largest in the world (Greenland is the first). It is located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, in the region of Melanesia. The independent state of Papua New Guinea is occupying the eastern half of the island (the western part belongs to Indonesia), plus numerous offshore smaller islands. Papua New Guinea is mostly mountainous and covered with tropical rainforest, as well as large floodplains surrounding the major tropical rivers Fly and Sepik. Highlands ik p Se sin Ba - When watched from a satellite (facing southward) it makes it look green in a stark contrast to the nearby desert of Australia. Papua New Guinea is one of the most diverse countries on Earth, with over 850 languages (out of a population of 6 million). The country is one of the world's least explored, both culturally (people) and geographically. The state of Papua New Guinea encourages the active preservation of the immense culture diversity. The annual Mt. Hagen Cultural Show in the Highlands is a part of it. Various regional, provincial, even national tribal dance groups gather to celebrate their cultural heritage in the form of "Sing-sing". It is hoped that the element of competition among the different groups will substitute for the traditional endless tribal warfare. Our visit to the Mt. Hagen Show in the Highlands began on an airstrip by the Sepik River. The organizing committee. Day one (of two) – the opening parade. A ceremonial part with the Governor participation. Day two begins with makeup, having spent overnight on the show grounds.


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